Reformed Scholasticism: Distinguishing Ends

“For educated men distinguish the end of the work from the end of working” (Samuel Rutherford, Disputatio Scholastica de Divina Providentia, p. 215). [1] This is a basic introduction to a distinction that one will commonly come across in reading Reformed Theology. This distinction will greatly assist in one’s understanding of theological concepts. We will define… Read More Reformed Scholasticism: Distinguishing Ends

Are Only Explicit Scripture Proofs Valid?

“The whole counsel of God, concerning all things necessary for his own glory, man’s salvation, faith, and life, is either expressly set down in Scripture, or by good and necessary consequence may be deduced from Scripture…” (Westminster Confession of Faith 1:6). What does this phrase mean and how may it be proved from Scripture? Westminster… Read More Are Only Explicit Scripture Proofs Valid?

What It Does Not Have, It Cannot Impart

Adding on to our last post summarizing a few scholastic concepts: Causality: Five Metaphysical Distinctions, this post briefly considers another important principle often used in Reformed Theology and gives a few examples of the principle in practice. What it does not have, it cannot impart. “The logic of causality also dictates that proximate or closely related causes… Read More What It Does Not Have, It Cannot Impart

Causality: Five Metaphysical Distinctions

Metaphysics is the philosophical knowledge concerned with the fundamental nature of knowing and being. Since God is the creator of all things, it is important that we understand the natural world around us and His revelation to us in Scripture in a precise and logical manner. The metaphysical distinctions of causality are crucial in understanding Reformed… Read More Causality: Five Metaphysical Distinctions